Author: Jonathon at Selby Shrooms

The colours of autumn and winter 2018

Well the 2018 Fungi season in the Dandenong Ranges started very slow – a long period of virtually no rain between December 26 to around April made grass remain dry and did not promote the growth of fungi. By the time the rains did come the ground temperatures were quite low and relative humidity still took until June to promote significant mushroom numbers in the Dandenongs. Birch Boletes and some confirmed Porcini were the first to arrive (boletes generally preferring warmer soils), but then we finally got significant Saffrons, Enokitakes and a virtual plague of Armillaria luteobubalina once the...

Read More

Boletus edulis – Porcini – 100% confirmed in the Dandenong Ranges

When I was chatting to a mother at school drop off about mushrooms I never suspected that one of the mushrooms she was mentioning to me would turn out to be Boletus edulis – the much coveted Porcini mushroom! But photos demonstrating heavily reticulated stout stipes on obvious boletes growing under Oak were highly suggestive of the species and after looking at specimens first hand including one still attached to the ground I can confirm that Porcini do indeed grow at the Big Moon Harvest Farm in Cockatoo in the Dandenong Ranges. With the age of some of the...

Read More

Agaricus of the Dandenongs DNA project results

For some time the majority of our profits have been directed towards DNA extraction and phylogenetic examination of our native or at least locally growing Agaricus here in the Dandenongs. Many of the results have been surprising. Some species identified by mycologists as being a native species, turned out via DNA to be synonymous with foreign species. The results matching collection specimens with phylogenetic results via BLAST have been posted...

Read More

Chanterelles from Northern NSW

While Victoria is experiencing some amazingly dry conditions for this time of year – with trees including Eucalypts dying from lack of rain even now in April – up in Northern NSW our good friend the ‘Chant Whisperer’ Martin Martini has been busting the whole chant concept right open with clumping chants, white chants, brown chants and smooth chants. Someone once emphatically told me we had about six species of chant in Australia – I think Martin has found that many in two weeks! Even Jsun had never seen some of these ones before! Here are some of the...

Read More

More successful Far North Queensland Chanterelle finds

Thanks to a new friend up in Far North Queensland we were happy to hear of a large FNQ chanterelle find up that way. Apparently there were thousands below what appeared to be a very large Idiospermum tree although this identification is still being confirmed. Similar to our previous find these are fairly large yellow ‘smooth’ chanterelles with fairly thin cap margins, and smooth rather than thick, distinct pseudogills/veins. Hopefully this time we will successfully obtain a viable specimen for DNA purposes. As an update – we’ve had some issues with our website and as a consequence only recently...

Read More

Agaricus flocculosipes – an edible species of the arvensis clade – updated!

I would have sworn this mushroom was Agaricus augustus and it seemed to have many of its macroscopic characteristics. So I was very surprised to get a DNA sequence for this mushroom confirming with 99% certainty that this mushroom is actually Agaricus flocculosipes. This species was first described from Thailand from the arvensis clade of Agaricus although this species was reported as larger and potentially a great cultivation option. Thanks to Wayne Boatwright in South Eastern Queensland. Wayne was kind enough to authorise the use of these photos so that the record can be kept here for interest purposes....

Read More

Agaricus subrutilescens – a new addition to Australian Agaricus

A large Agaricus we have in the past incorrectly described as Agaricus austrovinaceus, DNA results came back confirming it as Agaricus subrutilescens – a species that as far as we are aware has never been officially recorded in Australia before. The phenotype we find in the southern Dandenongs is a large, scaled cap with brownish to purplish colouring, white to grey gills that turn chocolate brown with age, a thick stipe that can be spindle shaped, meaty and often worm-ridden. The largest specimen here was 19cms in diameter so quite large. Growing under Pinus radiate and native Messmate...

Read More

Monster of suburbia – massive Pleurotus australis find (cloned)

Driving through a random street in the suburbs in the foothills of the Dandenongs and we spotted a monster! What a massive and amazing creature! Two massive fruitbodies of a Pleurotus species growing on a stump. The size of the stems were more like king oysters than other types of oysters. Not only did it smell aniseedy like a wild oyster should, but the stems almost smelled nutty like a birch bolete. The feature that caught our eye with the most interest beyond the size of these monsters was the criss-crossed gills on the stipe – a feature used...

Read More

Beef steak fungus – Fistulina hepatica

During our foraging hikes recently we happened upon a beafsteak fungus growing off a very healthy looking Messmate Eucalypt. I was very excited as I had been looking for this bracket fungus for several years. Its smell was quite unusual and because of its clear identifying features and the lack of dangerous lookalikes I was confident about cooking and eating this fungus. Slicing the fungus you could clearly see why it was described as appearing similar to a steak of beef – it looked and felt incredibly similar, even mildly bleeding a red resin. I cooked this in sesame...

Read More

Get ShroomNews!

Enter your email address to get our latest posts straight to your inbox

Join 226 other subscribers

Recent Comments

Get ShroomNews!

Enter your email address to get our latest posts straight to your inbox

Join 226 other subscribers

Need help? Ask us! Selby Shrooms Customer Service
Send