Victorian red-staining Agaricus

Victorian red-staining Agaricus

One of the most interesting local Agaricus is the Victorian brown-capped red stainer.

The most common variant is a dense, thickly scaled Agaricus species with brown to occasionally almost purple thick scales on its cap. These scales rarely appear darker in the middle, but rather remain consistent in colour and density right to the margin of the cap. The cap reaches a maximum diameter of about 10cms.

The veil is unremarkable and rarely forming more than a ring when hanging as a skirt.

The gills and margin of this species stains mildly red when damaged. When sliced the flesh also stains red above the gills and at the base of the stipe/stem.

While DNA sequencing places this mushroom within Agaricus section Sanguinolenti which its red staining probably supports (this section includes Agaricus silvaticus) , it is quite distant to even its closest relatives – 4% away from bohusii and amicosis.

This is a quality edible Agaricus – up there with bitorquis in terms of strong classic Agaricus flavours.

Victorian red-staining AgaricusVictorian red-staining Agaricus

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A second variant – that is 1% away from this species according to BLASTn – which may or may not be significant – is a variant/phenotype that is found under Pine radiata and stains red or brown and appears to have a more pronounce umbo:

Victorian red-staining AgaricusVictorian red-staining AgaricusVictorian red-staining AgaricusVictorian red-staining AgaricusVictorian red-staining AgaricusVictorian red-staining Agaricus

10 thoughts on “Victorian red-staining Agaricus”

  1. I have some mycelium I extracted from different sources. I believe it may belong to porcini, Not sure if it is what I believe it may be or could be contaminant.
    Before I start spreading it on the grain, I would like to be 100% sure that it is real thing.

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